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We’ve all been there. You want to have a relaxing facial or try the latest beauty trend. But 24 hours later, your face is inflamed and burning. YIKES. This recently happened to me after a visit to get a facial.  

The following photos are the results. CONTACT DERMATITIS (a skin allergy)

 

 
 

Scary I know. It took an entire week of medication prescribed by my Dermatologist Dr. Deborah Grayman at Pure Skin Dermatology www.pureskindermatology.com

and Skin Champagnes Blue Caviar Cleanser and Creme De Caviar to clear this up. 

Now, let's discuss how you can prevent this from happening to you, why you should always patch test a new skin care product and the reactions to look out for.

 

What is patch testing?

Often ignored, patch testing is a method of testing a new product to see if your skin will have an allergic reaction to the ingredients. 

Patch testing for allergic reactions

You should patch test in two places: First, somewhere hidden, and then somewhere close to the area where the product will be applied. For example, if you’re testing for your face, try the side of your neck or behind your ear. If you’re testing for your elsewhere on your body, try your belly.

Once you’ve determined your location, make sure it is clean and apply a small amount to the area. Reactions will typically occur with 24 hours but may take up to 72 hours.

Patch testing for breakouts

Testing for breakouts should be done differently. First, you should apply the product on either your nose, cheek or chin. These are two areas that are most prone to breakouts because there’s a higher concentration of oil-producing glands. Product-related breakouts typically occur within a week, so apply your new product daily (to the same area) for a week to determine whether your skin will react. 

Reactions to look for:

  • Normal reactions: If the only reaction is the product doing what it promised, then you’ve found your product holy grail!
  • Breakouts: Look out for pimples, white or blackheads. If your skin is breaking out, it’s best to discontinue use.
  • Mild reactions: You may also experience a mild reaction, which could mean one of two things. The first is that your skin isn’t fond of the product or you’re using a product that causes an intended reaction. Products containing lactic, salicylic,  glycolic acids, hydroquinone and retinol can cause this to occur. These reactions should be short and will occur almost immediately after application. If skin settles down within that half hour, though, you are fine.
  • Major reactions: A major reaction will be quite noticeable. Your skin will likely look inflamed, bumpy or splotchy, and it will feel itchy. In this case, you should discontinue use. Depending on the severity, you may have to consult with a Dermatologist. 

 

 Now that you know better, do better. CHEERS!

We’ve all been there. You want to have a relaxing facial or try the latest beauty trend. But 24 hours later, your face is inflamed and burning. YIKES. This recently happened to me after a visit to get a facial.  

The following photos are the results. CONTACT DERMATITIS (a skin allergy)

 

 
 

Scary I know. It took an entire week of medication prescribed by my Dermatologist Dr. Deborah Grayman at Pure Skin Dermatology www.pureskindermatology.com

and Skin Champagnes Blue Caviar Cleanser and Creme De Caviar to clear this up. 

Now, let's discuss how you can prevent this from happening to you, why you should always patch test a new skin care product and the reactions to look out for.

 

What is patch testing?

Often ignored, patch testing is a method of testing a new product to see if your skin will have an allergic reaction to the ingredients. 

Patch testing for allergic reactions

You should patch test in two places: First, somewhere hidden, and then somewhere close to the area where the product will be applied. For example, if you’re testing for your face, try the side of your neck or behind your ear. If you’re testing for your elsewhere on your body, try your belly.

Once you’ve determined your location, make sure it is clean and apply a small amount to the area. Reactions will typically occur with 24 hours but may take up to 72 hours.

Patch testing for breakouts

Testing for breakouts should be done differently. First, you should apply the product on either your nose, cheek or chin. These are two areas that are most prone to breakouts because there’s a higher concentration of oil-producing glands. Product-related breakouts typically occur within a week, so apply your new product daily (to the same area) for a week to determine whether your skin will react. 

Reactions to look for:

  • Normal reactions: If the only reaction is the product doing what it promised, then you’ve found your product holy grail!
  • Breakouts: Look out for pimples, white or blackheads. If your skin is breaking out, it’s best to discontinue use.
  • Mild reactions: You may also experience a mild reaction, which could mean one of two things. The first is that your skin isn’t fond of the product or you’re using a product that causes an intended reaction. Products containing lactic, salicylic,  glycolic acids, hydroquinone and retinol can cause this to occur. These reactions should be short and will occur almost immediately after application. If skin settles down within that half hour, though, you are fine.
  • Major reactions: A major reaction will be quite noticeable. Your skin will likely look inflamed, bumpy or splotchy, and it will feel itchy. In this case, you should discontinue use. Depending on the severity, you may have to consult with a Dermatologist. 

 

 Now that you know better, do better. CHEERS!

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